Decaf: Timana // Colombia

From $19.75

Timana-Colombia-Decaf-17.04.10
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Decaf: Timana // Colombia

From $19.75

Grown by seven farmers near the surrounding municipality of Timana in Southern Huila, this coffee was decaffeinated with an all-natural process using sugar cane. The Ethyl Acetate method results in a coffee that retains its characteristics and flavours, but not the caffeine.

Our coffee is roasted and shipped the same week you order it – freshness is guaranteed.

Tasting Notes

Strawberry / Plum / Toasted Marshmallow

Flavour Profile

Approachable Exotic
Clear selection

We have been using Swiss Water to decaffeinate the last few decaf coffees we have offered. We’ve been happy with the quality they have produced; however, the issue we’ve faced is ensuring that we’re using fresh green to decaffeinate with. This is particularly challenging given the time of year, as our Central American coffees that make great, approachable decafs are from over a year ago. Our green freezing program has been a game-changer for quality preservation, ensuring that we continue to offer you vibrant coffees year-round, but we can’t freeze green if we’re going to decaffeinate it! We can only freeze it after it’s been decaffeinated.

This coffee was decaffeinated at a facility called DESCAFESOL, which is actually the first and only coffee decaffeination facility in Colombia. Here, the coffee goes through a unique water and ethyl acetate (EA) process. The water is from the nearby mountains and the EA is naturally sourced from sugar cane.

The EA process is often misunderstood, and the concern over Ethyl Acetate is likely from the scary “chemical” sounding name it has. Ethyl Acetate is an “ester” and is derived from the reaction of Ethanol (pure alcohol) and Acetic Acid (pure vinegar). Both of these inputs are of course consumable by us! In our case, the Ethanol comes from the fermentation of sugar cane molasses (the sugar cane is grown in Colombia).

During the decaf process the beans are heated with steam to open the pores, then an Ethyl Acetate wash is applied. According to DESCAFESOL, this is one case where water (the universal solvent) is not the best choice. Caffeine is very stubborn and difficult to remove and it’s more soluble in Ethyl Acetate than water. Additionally, Ethyl Acetate boils off at only 77 degrees C. It is long gone before the coffee is ever roasted, but if any residue ever existed it would vanish in the roasting process, which heats the beans to over 200 degrees Celsius. It is also useful to note that Ethyl Acetate naturally occurs in wine. As you can imagine from the above chemistry, it’s produced when the grapes are fermented. Ethyl Acetate at the right concentration is actually sought after in wine as it contributes to a wine’s perceived “fruitiness”.

REGION: Southern Huila
PROCESSING: Traditional fully-washed process in micro-mills at each farm
DECAF PROCESS: DESCAFECOL natural processing using mountain water and sugar cane
HARVEST DATE: October-December 2016

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